Berlin

Berlin, the united Capital of Germany since 1990, is now one of Europe’s most-visited cities. As it greets an ever-rising tide of visitors, this pretty, creative town is a great destination for every age and interests.

Once a geographical and cultural backwater, it’s now the center of the EU transport network and a creative centre, which is home to thousands of artists, writers and musicians.

Design, culture and fashion reflect the perspective of life in Berlin. The unfinished, the sense of moving forward, and relentless change induce artists to cutting edge and varied designs. Its humming nightlife, its many cafeterias, clubs, and bars attract many visitors but Berlin is best famous for its history and the reunification of Germany which can often be experienced at many sites. It also hosts countless museums, palaces and other sites of world historic interest.

In contrast to popular belief, Berlin is also home to several modern, high end shopping areas crammed with shops and little shops that offer the most recent in Western european trends and fashion. Berlin offers something for everyone. It’s food & drink offerings from local specialities eg the famous Currywurst and Buletten ( Sausage with curry sauce and meatballs ) or specialities from all over the world offer something for each taste and budget.

Weather
Chance of Rain
Friday 24/11/2017 60%
Chance of Rain
Cloudy with occasional showers this afternoon. High 56F. Winds SW at 10 to 20 mph. Chance of rain 60%.
Rain
Saturday 25/11/2017 100%
Rain
Periods of rain. High 43F. Winds NNE at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 100%. Rainfall around a half an inch.
Mostly Cloudy
Sunday 26/11/2017 10%
Mostly Cloudy
Partly cloudy skies in the morning will give way to cloudy skies during the afternoon. High 41F. Winds WSW at 10 to 20 mph.
Mostly Cloudy
Monday 27/11/2017 10%
Mostly Cloudy
A mix of clouds and sun in the morning followed by cloudy skies during the afternoon. High 42F. Winds SW at 10 to 20 mph.
Chance of Rain
Tuesday 28/11/2017 40%
Chance of Rain
Cloudy with occasional rain showers. High 42F. Winds SSW at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 40%.
Chance of Rain
Wednesday 29/11/2017 40%
Chance of Rain
Rain showers early with overcast skies later in the day. High 42F. Winds SSE at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 40%.
What To Do

Museum Island – The Museum Island as only ensemble of an educational landscape represents a hundred years of museum design in central Berlin. In 1999 UNESCO announced the Museum Island an international heritage preservation site. It homes archaeological collections and art of the 19th century. Developments of the building complicated started with the Altes Museum where King Frederick William III made art treasures accessible to the general public for the 1st time in 1830.

When the Pergamon Museum opened in 1930, it marked the completion of the Museum Island complicated. During the second World War just about seventy percent of the buildings were wrecked. A big reconstruction and modernisation program is continuing to beat the outcome of the war and division. Almost all of the first collections, which were split between west and east after the war, are now shown brought back together.

Bode Museum – The Bode Museum, at the north end of Museum Island in Berlin’s Mitte district, is in the old museum centre of Berlin. Frederick William IV saw the island in the Stream Frenzy as a ” Refuge of Art and Science”.Set up in 1904, the Bode Museum re-opened in 2006 after in depth restorations. It contains a wealth of art and artefacts from the Byzantine and Medieval periods, essentially from Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, France and Spain.

Designed by the head government-building officer Ernst von Ihne, the Bode Museum was built in the style known as “Wilhelminian Baroque” for Wilhelm II. It’s a stately, palatial building with its outer wings immediately overlooking the Stream Frenzy on either side of Museum Island. The northwest corner of the museum, which occupies the end of the island, is crowned with a big Baroque dome. At the other end, a smaller dome overlooks train tracks that run across the island. The inside is bright and roomy and finished with fine architectural details.

Neues Museum – Found on Museum Island, The Neues Museum was designed by Friedrich Aug Stler and built between 1841 and 1859. At the time it was built, the Neues Museum was one of the most aspiring building projects in Prussia. In depth bombing in the 2nd World War left the building in ruins, with whole sections missing absolutely and others seriously damaged. After more than 10 years of radical work, the completion of the reconstructed Neues Museum was celebrated in an official ceremony on five March 2009 and will reopen in October.

The Neues Museum will home the archaeological collections of the capital’s Egyptian Museum including the 3,400-year-old Egyptian bust of Nefertiti, which should have its own hall. Pergamon Museum The Pergamon Museum is found on the Museum Island This museum was designed by Alfred Messel and took 20 years to build ( 1910-1930 ). It’s a globally famous traditional history museum that contains a couple of superb artefacts , for example the gigantic Altar of Zeus and the famous Ishtar Gate from Babylon. The Pergamon contains 3 separate museums : the Collection of Classical Antiquities ( Antikensammlung ), the Museum of the traditional Near East ( Vorderasiatisches Museum ), and the Museum of Islamic Art ( Museum fr Islamische Kunst ).

Die Alte Nationalgalerie The Alte Nationalgalerie ( Old State Studio ) found on the Museum Island in Berlin, is a studio that boasts a collection of 19th-century art and a wide range of a decent range of a reasonable range of 20th-century German pieces. The gallery also owns major collections of French Impressionist works, including masterpieces by Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas, Czanne and Rodin. The Nationalgalerie was set up in 1861, after the donations of 262 paintings by banker Johann Heinrich Wagener. Originally, the collection was housed in the buildings of the Akademie der Knste.

Friedrich Aug Stler planned the present building in 1865, basing it on a sketch by King Frederick William IV of Prussia. Overseen by Heinrich Strack, its construction occurred between 1869 and 1876. The building was badly damaged in World War II air raids. It was partially re-opened in 1949, but reconstruction continued till 1969. Between 1998 and 2001, the museum was reconstructed totally. Some additional halls were added on the uppermost floor and now contain the Romantic works.